New paper: Conjugation-Induced Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence (TADF): From Conventional Non-TADF Units to TADF-Active Polymers

In a recent collaboration with our colleagues at the Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden (IPF), we have developed polymers that show thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) properties with high efficiency. This work has now been published in Advanced Functional Materials under the title: Conjugation-Induced Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence (TADF): From Conventional Non-TADF Units to TADF-Active Polymers. Interestingly, the monomer building block does not show TADF but rather only phosphorescence. Hence, the TADF property is induced as a consequence of increased conjugation during polymer formation. Ultimately, the singlet-triplet splitting is reduced in the polymer to allow for TADF. The emitter shows sky-blue emission with roughly 70% PLQY. This report includes the synthesis of the monomer and polymer materials, quantum chemical calculations and a detailed photo-physical characterization.

Advertisements

Preview: Two sessions on Wednesday

Tomorrow, Wednesday March 30, we have two sessions at our Symposium EP1: Organic Excitonic Systems and Devices.

EP1.2: Organic Emitters

The morning focus will be on the emitters itself, where we will here recent progress on various molecular concepts for high performance luminescence. This will include the fundamental studies that excel our current understanding of these emitters. Some things that we will see:

  • Design rules for TADF emitters
  • Crystalline OLED emission layers for nearly perfect emitter alignment
  • Investigation of exciplex emission (electric field dependence and charge separation)
  • Nickel-Tetra-Mesityl-Porphoyrin photophysics
  • Platinum complexes for high efficiency, color pure blue OLEDs
  • Control of molecular orientation
  • TADF emitters for LECs and OLEDs
  • Biluminescence for optical sensing
  • Photophysics of H- and J-aggregates

Our invited speakers of the morning are: Andrew Monkman, Wolfgang Brütting, and Frank Würthner.

EP1.3: Organic Lasers

In the afternoon we switch gears – Its laser time. With the basis of the laser tutorial we had on Monday, we should be all set for some interesting contributions related to laser physics with organics. Important: Due to a serious illness of one of our speakers, the program of the first part of the EP1.3 session has been updated. We will start at 2:00pm rather than the originally planned time of 1:30pm. Please refer to the online program for the latest updates!

Here are some details to the post-lunch session:

  • Condensate physics with organic polaritons
  • Tunable, narrow line width solid-state lasers
  • LED-pumped organic lasers (planar integration) based on luminescent concentration
  • Self-assembled colloidal lasers
  • Low threshold up-converted laser
  • Strong coupling in organic microcavities
  • Solvent nano imprint lithography of polymer lasers
  • Photoluminescence enhancement in nano cavities

Our afternoon invited speakers are: Stéphane Kéna-Cohen and Alexander J. Kuehne.

Again, a lot of cool and interesting things to look forward to. See you tomorrow!