SPIE Europe 2018 /Only 3 days left for abstact submission

The abstract submission deadline for the upcoming SPIE Photonics Europe 2018 (April 22-26, 2018) in Strasbourg, France, is closing in: October 23, 2017, so only 3 days to go!

My colleague Koen Vandewal and I organize the new Conference Organic Electronics and Photonics: Fundamentals and Devices (EPE117).

We are inviting everyone working in the field of organic electronics and photonics to consider our Conference and to submit an abstract. We are looking forward to a broad, state-of-the-art exchange of research and development trends.

Please do also spread the word, if you know colleagues of yours, who might be interested to go.

Advertisements

Session preview: Excitons in Organic and Hybrid Systems I

This announcement comes in parallel with the start of the session Excitons in Organic and Hybrid Systems I of our Symposium EP1, which began 5 minutes ago. Today we are looking in more detail on processes connected with excitons in organic and hybrid systems. We will see sophisticated techniques, modeling, etc.

Here are some keywords that we will come across during the morning program:

  • Nanoscale exciton migration
  • QM/MM simulation of TADF materials
  • Exciton migration in TADF materials
  • Exciton transport in colloidal QDs
  • Spin oscillations
  • Single molecule look on TADF
  • Spatial confinement of triplet excitons in rubrene
  • Exciton processes in OLEDs

Our invitees are Naomi Ginsberg, William Tisdale, John Lupton, and Grayson Ingram.

New paper: What happens, when you push on TADF-type exciplex systems?

In a new paper – Spin-dependent charge transfer state design rules in organic photovoltaics –  published in Nature Communications, we probe intermolecular charge transfer states with the aid of their luminescent thermally activated delayed fluorescence  (TADF) channel. In addition to probing this TADF with time-resolved photoluminescence alone, we examine the dynamics of the system under a variation of the electron and hole spacing of the CT states, controlled through external pressure. The comparison of two different acceptor molecules with either low or high local triplet energies directly shows the significance of the careful energetic design of charge separating interface in organic photovoltaics. Here, a low lying triplet level on the acceptor significantly quenches the CT triplet states, increasing the overall recombination losses.